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How to Explain Anything to Anyone Easily

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How to Explain Anything to Anyone Easily

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Do you get in your own way during a job interview or while giving a presentation? If so, you might be wondering:

“What can I do to quickly explain something when in the moment?”

Thankfully, there are ways to do this and they are very simple ways. Author of Speaking Up without Freaking Out: 50 Techniques for Confident and Compelling Presenting, Matthew Abrahams informs us, “When you are in a spontaneous speaking situation, you have to do two things simultaneously,”

  1. Figure out what to say.
  2. Figure out how to say it.

Let’s examine 8 spontaneous speaking structures that allow you to become comfortable and respond immediately to any speaking situation.

What are Spontaneous Speaking Structures?

A spontaneous speaking structure is a way to tell a story. It is a way to explain anything quickly by using simple structures to frame a story.

“Structure sets you free.” – Matthew Abrahams

Here’s why structures set you free:

Speaking structures help you explain anything ad lib. They provide an easy way to structure our thinking and prevent us from freezing in the moment.

Abrahams informs us,

“You need to set expectations and structures do that.”

I highly recommend watching the following video (the video is long so I recommend you skip to 41 minutes in where spontaneous speaking structures are discussed in more detail):

8 Spontaneous Speaking Structures

Let’s now examine 8 spontaneous speaking structures:

1. What? So What? Now What?

image via Stanford Graduate School of Business: Think Fast, Talk Smart: Communication Techniques

Terry Borton’s Development Framework was constructed in 1970 and is a simple approach involving only three questions: What? So What? Now What? 1 I recently wrote about this framework in Razor-Sharp Thinking: the What-Why Method. This framework provides us a formula for answering questions.

  • What? What happened or what is emerging?
  • So What? Why is it important or what lessons can we learn from it?
  • Now What? What are we going to do next or what should we do moving forward?

2. Who? Why? What?

Abrahams provides an easy way for us to use Borton’s Development Framework when introducing someone by simply changing the What to Who.

  • Who? Who they are.
  • Why? Why the person is important.
  • What? What we are going to do next (i.e. listen to their presentation).

3. Problem/Opportunity – Solution – Benefit

image via Stanford Graduate School of Business: Think Fast, Talk Smart: Communication Techniques

Another powerful, yet extremely simple technique is the Problem (or Opportunity) – Solution – Benefit structure. Abrahams explains that this is a great technique to use when pitching or persuading someone.

  • Problem/Opportunity. What do you want to solve or what do you want to capture?
  • Solution. What are the steps to achieve it?
  • Benefit. What is the benefit to their organization?
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Content Editor & Graphic Designer at Sec-Source Technologies. Entertainemt Department Director at Pycel Productions. Email: phe_sophannith@bluecoreinside.com

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